Paper Title:
Osteolysis Associated with Polythene Liners in Hydroxyapatite Hip Arthroplasty
  Abstract

Wear debris contributes to the development of granulomatous debris disease and loosening. It is accepted that hydroxyapatite ceramic (HA) will bond a prosthesis to bone.[1,2] Osteolysis has not been seen for several years after implantation but cases are now emerging [3]. Is HA still working? Should we use hard on hard bearings? Should we abandon polythene liners? With a modular hip system, patients with polythene acetabular liners have been compared with those with ceramic liners. Polythene liners wear out and patients with a life expectancy of more than ten years should have ceramic/ceramic bearings.

  Info
Periodical
Key Engineering Materials (Volumes 330-332)
Main Theme
Edited by
Xingdong Zhang, Xudong Li, Hongsong Fan, Xuanyong Liu
Pages
1259-1262
DOI
10.4028/www.scientific.net/KEM.330-332.1259
Citation
J. M. Buchanan, "Osteolysis Associated with Polythene Liners in Hydroxyapatite Hip Arthroplasty", Key Engineering Materials, Vols. 330-332, pp. 1259-1262, 2007
Online since
February 2007
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Price
$32.00
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