Paper Title:
Research on Sessile Organism Removal from Metal Using the Underwater Shock Wave
  Abstract

The sessile organism of the oyster and the barnacle, etc. causes friction between the surface of the ship and the water. Friction causes the deterioration of fuel cost. In addition, dry dock operation with putting the ship on the land or the diving operation, are needed for the removal of the sessile organism. These works require a very high cost. Various techniques for reducing friction resistance have been proposed. On the other hand, the method for the practical use is not popular still now. Authors tried to perform an experiment to remove the sessile organism on surface of the metal by using the underwater shock wave.

  Info
Periodical
Edited by
S. Itoh and K. Hokamoto
Pages
203-206
DOI
10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.566.203
Citation
A. Takemoto, T. Watanabe, H. Iyama, S. Itoh, "Research on Sessile Organism Removal from Metal Using the Underwater Shock Wave", Materials Science Forum, Vol. 566, pp. 203-206, 2008
Online since
November 2007
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Price
$32.00
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