Paper Title:
The Half-Cycle Slip Activity of Persistent Slip Bands in Polycrystals
  Abstract

The development of the volume fraction of cumulated persistent slip bands (PSBs) in cyclically deformed nickel polycrystals was investigated in dependence on the number of cycles using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was shown that there is a large scatter of the volume fraction of PSBs from grain to grain. Three different tendencies for the development of the volume fraction with increasing number of cycles were distinguished. It was shown that there is a correlation of the orientation of the primary slip systems with the volume fraction of cumulated PSBs and the activation of PSBs during half-cycle deformation.

  Info
Periodical
Materials Science Forum (Volumes 567-568)
Edited by
Pavel Šandera
Pages
123-127
DOI
10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.567-568.123
Citation
A. Weidner, W. Tirschler, C. Blochwitz, W. Skrotzki, "The Half-Cycle Slip Activity of Persistent Slip Bands in Polycrystals", Materials Science Forum, Vols. 567-568, pp. 123-127, 2008
Online since
December 2007
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