Impact Damage Detection in GFRP Laminates through Ultrasonic Imaging

Abstract:

Article Preview

Composite materials are increasingly used in aerospace, naval and automotive vehicles due to their high specific strength and stiffness. In the area of Non destructive testing, ultrasonic C-scans are used frequently to detect defects in composite components caused during fabrication and damage resulting from service conditions. Ultrasonic testing uses transmission of high frequency sound waves into a material to detect imperfections or to locate changes in material properties. The most commonly used ultrasonic testing technique is pulse echo and through transmission wherein sound is introduced into a test object and reflections (echoes) are returned to a receiver from internal imperfections. Under low-velocity impact loading delaminating is observed to be a major failure mode. This report presents the use of above two techniques to detect the damage in glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates. Pulse echo is used to locate the exact position of damage and through transmission is used to know the magnitude of damage in composite. This paper work will be carried out on two different thicknesses and at impact energy levels varying from 7 to 53J. The ensuring delamination damage will be determined by ultrasonic C-scans using the pulse-echo immersion method for through transmission. Delamination areas were quantified accurately by processing the raw image data using a digital image processing technique. Based on the data obtained, correlation will be established between the delamination area and the impact energy.

Info:

Periodical:

Edited by:

B.S.S. Daniel and G.P. Chaudhari

Pages:

337-341

Citation:

H. R. M. Naik et al., "Impact Damage Detection in GFRP Laminates through Ultrasonic Imaging", Advanced Materials Research, Vol. 585, pp. 337-341, 2012

Online since:

November 2012

Export:

Price:

$38.00

[1] Hosur MV, Murthy CRL, Ramamurthy TS, Shet A (1998). Estimation of impact-induced damage in CFRP laminates through ultrasonic imaging. NDT & E International, Vol. 31, No. 5, pp.359-374.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0963-8695(97)00053-4

[2] Roman Ruzek, Radek Lohonka, Josef Jironc (2006). Ultrasonic C-Scan and shearography NDI techniques evaluation of impact defects identification. NDT&E International, Vol. 39, p.132–142.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ndteint.2005.07.012

[3] W. Ke, M. Castaings, C. Bacon (2009). 3D finite element simulations of an air-coupled ultrasonic NDT system. NDT&E International, Vol. 42, p.524–533.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ndteint.2009.03.002

[4] Jung-Ryul Lee, Hiroshi Tsuda and Nobuyuki Toyama (2007) Impact wave and damage detections using a strain-free fiber Bragg grating ultrasonic receiver. NDT&E International, Vol. 40, p.85–93.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ndteint.2006.07.001

[5] Zongjie Cao, Huaidong Chen, Jin Xue, Yuwen Wang (2005) Evaluation of mechanical quality of field-assisted diffusion bonding by ultrasonic nondestructive method. Sensors and Actuators A, Vol. 118, p.44–48.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sna.2004.07.006

[6] W. Ke, M. Castaings, C. Bacon (2009). 3D finite element simulations of an air-coupled ultrasonic NDT system. NDT&E International, Vol. 42, p.524–533.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ndteint.2009.03.002