An Investigation into the Optimum Carbonization Conditions for the Production of Porous Carbon from a Solid Waste

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Cellulosic materials and cellulose derivatives have been long used in the synthesis of numerous materials. These include various products such as papers, cigarette filters and sanitary pads. Cigarette filters, containing 95% cellulose acetate fibers, are responsible for one of the largest solid wastes generation today. In this work, a simple one-step carbonization of cigarette filters under various operational parameters is used in order to produce porous carbon. The effects of various pyrolysis parameters including carbonization temperature, heating rate and hold time on the final porous carbon product have been investigated. Adsorption-desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) as well as thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) have been employed to characterize the pyrolyzed product. The optimum conditions for the production of porous carbon from cigarette filters in relation to its maximum specific surface area (637 m2/g BET surface area) is understood to be at a heating rate of 5 °C/min at 900 °C for 1 hour.

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Periodical:

Edited by:

Catalina Spataru

Pages:

88-92

Citation:

S. K. Yazdi et al., "An Investigation into the Optimum Carbonization Conditions for the Production of Porous Carbon from a Solid Waste", Advanced Materials Research, Vol. 587, pp. 88-92, 2012

Online since:

November 2012

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$38.00

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