Effect of Curing Condition on Some Properties of Cement Stabilized Lateritic Interlocking Bricks

Abstract:

Article Preview

The effect of three different curing conditions on the compressive strength and water absorption of lateritic interlocking bricks, produced with laterite stabilized with 0 %, 2 %, 4 %, 6 % and 8 % cement content was investigated. The study is aimed at providing an alternative to the conventional method of curing interlocking bricks. The three curing conditions used in the study are A (covering of bricks with tarpaulin after sprinkling with water twice a day) B (complete immersion in water) C (complete covering with air and water tight polythene bags). Laterite used in the production of interlocking bricks was as an A-2-7 soil, using the AASHTO system of soil classification. Compressive strength of bricks increased with cement content and days under the different curing conditions, 28 day optimum compressive strength values of 4.28 N/mm2, 3.67 N/mm2 and 3.67 N/mm2 at 8 % cement content was obtained from bricks using curing condition C B and A respectively. Water absorption value decreased with cement content under the different curing conditions, minimum water absorption values of 2.44 %, 1.68 % and 1.72 % at 8 % cement content was obtained with bricks cured under curing condition A B and C respectively. Based on results of test, curing condition C is recommended for use in the production of cement stabilized interlocking bricks, as this will enhance effective production of interlocking bricks in areas where water is scarce.

Info:

Periodical:

Edited by:

Prof. A.O. Akii Ibhadode and E.O. Aluyor

Pages:

37-43

Citation:

M. Joel and J. E. Edeh, "Effect of Curing Condition on Some Properties of Cement Stabilized Lateritic Interlocking Bricks", Advanced Materials Research, Vol. 824, pp. 37-43, 2013

Online since:

September 2013

Export:

Price:

$38.00

[1] C.I. Syal, A.K. Goel, Reinforced Conrete Structures, S. Chand and Company Ltd, Ram Nagar, New Delhi, (2004).

[2] K.M. Leet, D. Bernal, Reinforced Concrete Design. Mc-Graw-Hill, New York, (1997).

[3] J.L. Murdock, M.K. Brook, J.D. Dewar, Concrete Materials and Practice, Edward Arnold, London, (1991).

[4] S.M. Shetty, Concrete Technology; Theory and Practice, S. Chand and company Ltd, RamNagar, New Delhi, (2005).

[5] BS 1924 Stabilized material for Civil Engineering Purpose. British Standards Institution, London, (1990).

[6] G.A. Kerali, Durability of Compressed and Cement-Stabilized Building Bricks: unpublished Ph. D thesis University of warwick, (2001).

[7] A. E. Adam, Compressed Stabilised Earth Block Manufactured in Sudan, Grapho print, for UNESCO, Paris, France, (2001).

[8] International Labour Organisation Small Scale Manufacture of Stabilized Soil Bricks, Technical Memorandum No 12. International Labour office: Switzerland. (1987).

[9] NBRRI, Nigerian Building and Road Research Institute, Interlocking Brick making machine, NBBRI Newsletter 1 (1) (2006)15 -17.

[10] BS 1377 Methods of Testing Soils for Civil Engineering Purpose. British Standards Institution, London, (1990).

[11] National Building Code, Building Regulations, Lexis Nexis : Butterworths, OH. (2006).

[12] Hydraform, Hydraform Brick making Machine Manual, Hydraform Group, www. hydraform. com, (2004).

[13] V. Rigassi, Compressed Earth Bricks: Manual of Production, Vol 1. CRA Terre-EAG. Vilefontaine, Cedex, France, (1995).

[14] Nigerian Industrial Standard, Standard for Sandcrete Bricks, ICS 91. 100. 20, NIS: Abuja, Nigeria. (2004).