Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation: Development and Applications of the EPR Test

Abstract:

Article Preview

The EPR test, designed to examine of the susceptibility to nonuniform, primarily intergranular corrosion, ranks among the more successful testing technique developments relating to stainless steels and alloys. One of its numerous advantages is that it lends itself to non-destructive, on-site examination. EPR enjoyed wide expansion over the years since first conceived by Čihal in 1969. Recent EPR measurements tend to focus on (1) double and/or single loop EPR as a modern technique used to establish the resistance of stainless steels and alloys to intergranular corrosion; (2) detecting integranular corrosion (IGC) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility in alloy steels and nickel alloys for nuclear engineering applications; and (3) studies of grain boundary precipitation and other minute local changes to alloy composition and structure.

Info:

Periodical:

Key Engineering Materials (Volumes 261-263)

Edited by:

Kikuo Kishimoto, Masanori Kikuchi, Tetsuo Shoji and Masumi Saka

Pages:

855-864

DOI:

10.4028/www.scientific.net/KEM.261-263.855

Citation:

V. Číhal et al., "Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation: Development and Applications of the EPR Test", Key Engineering Materials, Vols. 261-263, pp. 855-864, 2004

Online since:

April 2004

Export:

Price:

$35.00

In order to see related information, you need to Login.

In order to see related information, you need to Login.