Ultrasonic Friction Power in Microelectronic Wire Bonding

Abstract:

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An integrated sensor method is used to measure interfacial temperature profiles with an ultrasonic friction test process. The profiles are compared to numerical results obtained by a transient thermal 2D axisymmetric finite elements (FE) analysis. In the experiments, the 50 $m diameter gold balls used in wire bonding are deformed by the capillary tool during impacting on the flat surface of a silicon chip (contact zone). The deformed balls then are pressed onto the SiO2 layer on the chip and vibrated with various amplitudes of 128 kHz ultrasonics. The 52 $m diameter contact zone is surrounded in 14 $m distance by a 50  aluminum resistor which is used as a resistive temperature detector. Temperature increases of typically 0.18 K and up to 0.3 K are measured by the sensor close to the heat source at the contact zone, corresponding to 3.1 K and 5.2 K at the interface as suggested by the FE model. With typical bonding parameters, the contact zone friction power is determined to be 4.4 mW which is less than 2 % of the electrical energy delivered to the used ultrasonic transducer type.

Info:

Periodical:

Materials Science Forum (Volumes 539-543)

Main Theme:

Edited by:

T. Chandra, K. Tsuzaki, M. Militzer , C. Ravindran

Pages:

3920-3925

DOI:

10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.539-543.3920

Citation:

M. Mayer and A. Zwart, "Ultrasonic Friction Power in Microelectronic Wire Bonding", Materials Science Forum, Vols. 539-543, pp. 3920-3925, 2007

Online since:

March 2007

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$35.00

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