Addition of Calcareous Quarry to Bricklaying Mortars - Analysis of the Properties in Fresh State

Abstract:

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One of the major current environmental concerns is the excessive or inefficient consumption of non-renewable natural resources. The construction industry is one of the largest consumers of natural raw materials, playing an important role in the degradation of the environment. Recycling and reusing are concepts that can be effectively applied in the formulation of construction materials, especially mortars. In particular, calcareous quarry can replace, at least to some extent, the cement used in the composition of bricklaying mortars. The objective of this study was to prepare and characterize mortars containing calcareous quarry. The mortars were prepared using Portland CP II F – 32 cement, CH I hydrated lime, river sand and tap water. Different concentrations of residues, ranging from 5 to 30% were used to replace the cement. Mortars with volume ratio of 1:0.5:4.5, commonly used in bricklaying structural masonry, were evaluated. The water to cement ration was set to 1.45. The residue used was fully characterized to determine their specific mass, unitary mass, particle size distribution and morphology, and composition. The mortars were characterized both in their fresh and the results compared to those obtained from a residue-free composition. The results showed that the use of calcareous quarry partially replacing the cement did not significantly affect the performance of the mortars. Compositions containing up to 30% of calcareous quarry can be classified according to NBR 13281 (ABNT, 2005) as bricklaying mortars, and can be used by the construction industry.

Info:

Periodical:

Materials Science Forum (Volumes 636-637)

Edited by:

Luís Guerra ROSA and Fernanda MARGARIDO

Pages:

1286-1291

DOI:

10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.636-637.1286

Citation:

M. L. L. O. Santos et al., "Addition of Calcareous Quarry to Bricklaying Mortars - Analysis of the Properties in Fresh State", Materials Science Forum, Vols. 636-637, pp. 1286-1291, 2010

Online since:

January 2010

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$35.00

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