Papers by Author: Andrew Wescott

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Authors: Supriyo Ganguly, Andrew Wescott, T. Nagy, P. Colegrove, Stewart W. Williams
Abstract: Local mechanical tensioning is one of the most efficient and industrially relevant stress engineering techniques to modify weld residual stress field and subsequently reduce buckling distortion. However, application of rolling load and its magnitude need to be optimised for an energy efficient rolling process. In the present study gas metal arc butt welded plates of low carbon mild steel were rolled by a dual roller in different rolling configuration (top and reverse side rolling) and with different magnitude of rolling load. All the plates were rolled post welding. Residual strain profiles of the post weld rolled plates were measured, using the SALSA strain scanner, and the in-plane stress were characterized. Average distortion of the rolled plates was correlated with the residual stress. Reverse rolling was found to be more effective in removing distortion while the stress profiles did not show any significant reduction of the peak stress.
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Authors: David G. Richards, Philip B. Prangnell, Philip J. Withers, Stewart W. Williams, Andrew Wescott, E.C. Oliver
Abstract: Although Friction Stir Welding (FSW) avoids many of the problems encountered when fusion welding high strength Al-alloys, it can still result in substantial residual stresses that have a detrimental impact on service life. An FE model has been developed to investigate the effectives of the mechanical tensioning technique for controlling residual stresses in FSWs. The model purely considered the heat input and the mechanical effects of the tool were ignored. Variables, such as tensioning level, heat input, and plate geometry, have been studied. Good general agreement was found between modelling results and residual stress measurements, justifying the assumption that the stress development is dominated by the thermal field. The results showed a progressive decrease in the residual stresses for increasing tensioning levels and, although affected by the heat input, a relatively low sensitivity to the welding variables. At tensioning levels greater than ~ 50% of the room temperature yield stress, tensile were replaced by compressive residual stresses within the weld.
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Authors: David G. Richards, Philip B. Prangnell, Philip J. Withers, Stewart W. Williams, Andrew Wescott, E.C. Oliver
Abstract: Finite element modelling has proved to be an effective tool for the investigation of trends effected by changing welding conditions. This is especially important in mechanical tensioning of friction stir welds because of the large number of parameters involved. In this paper, an FE model is used to examine the effectiveness of the mechanical tensioning technique for controlling residual stresses in FSWs by the investigation of trends caused by changes to the welding parameters. Comparisons between different geometries, traverse speeds, and welding off-axis angle all produced consistent results, and showed that the peak stresses are most strongly influenced by both the local tensioning and heat input, and not by the more global welding conditions. The results also showed a progressive decrease in the residual stresses for increasing tensioning levels and, although affected by the heat input, a relatively low sensitivity to the welding variables. At tensioning levels greater than ~50% of the room temperature yield stress, tensile stresses were replaced by compressive residual stresses within the weld.
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Authors: Stewart W. Williams, Rajan Ambat, Debbie Price, Manthana Jariyaboon, Alison J. Davenport, Andrew Wescott
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