Papers by Author: Stuart Hampshire

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Authors: W.T. Young, L.K.L. Falk, H. Lemercier, Stuart Hampshire
289
Authors: Wynette Redington, Murt Redington, Stuart Hampshire
2125
Authors: Amir R. Hanifi, Annaik Genson, Michael J. Pomeroy, Stuart Hampshire
Abstract: Ca-Sialon glasses have been known for some time [1] and they are effectively calciumalumino- silicate glasses containing nitrogen which improves their mechanical properties. Calciumalumino- silicate glasses containing fluorine are known to have useful characteristics as potential bioactive materials [2]. Therefore, the combination of both nitrogen and fluorine additions to these glasses may give useful bioglasses with enhanced mechanical stability.Addition of fluorine to oxynitride glasses was not reported previously and this paper gives the first report of the glass forming regions (and evaluation of some properties) in the Ca-Si-Al-O-N-F system. Within the previously defined [1] glass forming region in the Ca-Si-Al-O-N system, homogeneous, dense glasses are formed. Addition of fluorine extends the glass forming region but also increases the reactivity of the glass melts. One major problem is fluorine loss as SiF4, but also loss of nitrogen, which affects the final composition and results in porous samples. To suppress the fluorine loss and CaF2 precipitation, consideration of the ratio of cations to fluorine and the coordination number of Al atoms is important. Discussion of the role of cations in these oxyfluoronitride glasses is presented.
17
Authors: Stuart Hampshire, Amir R. Hanifi, Annaik Genson, Michael J. Pomeroy
Abstract: Oxynitride glasses are effectively alumino-silicate glasses in which nitrogen substitutes for oxygen in the glass network, resulting in increases in glass transition and softening temperatures, viscosities (by two to three orders of magnitude), elastic moduli and microhardness. Calcium alumino-silicate glasses containing fluorine are known to have useful characteristics as potential bioactive materials. Therefore, the combination of both nitrogen and fluorine additions to these glasses may give useful bioglasses with enhanced mechanical stability. This paper gives a review of oxynitride glasses and reports glass formation and evaluation of glass properties in the Ca-Si-Al-O-N-F system. Within the previously defined glass forming region in the Ca-Si-Al-O-N system, homogeneous, dense glasses are formed. However, addition of fluorine affects glass formation and reactivity of the glass melts and can lead to fluorine loss as SiF4, but also nitrogen loss, and cause bubble formation. At high fluorine and high Ca contents under conditions when Ca- F bonding is favoured, CaF2 crystals precipitate in the glass. It was found that fluorine expands the glass forming region of Ca-Sialon system and facilitates the solution of nitrogen into the melt.
165
Authors: N.K. Schneider, H. Lemercier, Stuart Hampshire
265
Authors: R. Ramesh, P. Chevaux, H. Lemercier, Michael J. Pomeroy, Stuart Hampshire
189
Authors: E. Dolekcekic, G. Kaya, Bekir Karasu, Michael J. Pomeroy, Stuart Hampshire
1887
Authors: Csaba Balázsi, E. Dolekcekic, Zsuzsanna Kövér, Ferenc Wéber, Stuart Hampshire, Péter Arató
Abstract: In this work partially and fully densified silicon nitride based composites have been prepared using carbon black and graphite additions. Alumina and yttria sintering additives were also added to silicon nitride starting powders. Sinter-HIP and pressure-less sintering (PLS) have been employed for composite processing. The effects of carbon nano- and micro-grains on the microstructure, bending strength and hardness have been investigated. Higher strengths could be achieved by HIP, whereas more homogeneous properties can be assured by PLS.
242
Authors: Michael J. Pomeroy, Stuart Hampshire
Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the crystallisation of an oxynitride glass likely to remain in a silicon nitride ceramic following firing. The crystallisation process was studied using both differential thermal analysis (DTA) and separate isothermal heat treatments in a tube furnace under nitrogen. The activation energy for the crystallisation process was determined by DTA. The nucleation temperature, Tg + 40°C, which corresponded to the maximum volume fraction of crystalline phases, agreed closely with the optimum nucleation temperature of Tg + 35°C, found from DTA. The optimum crystal growth temperature was observed to be 1210°C and yielded the - and -polymorphs of yttrium disilicate. Heat treatments at other temperatures indicated the development of phase assemblages which contained different polymorphs of yttrium disilicate as well as silicon oxynitride. Not all of the polymorphic transformations of yttrium disilicate were observed by DTA unless some crystallisation exotherms were deconvoluted, indicating that DTA analysis of the crystallisation of complex systems requires careful interpretation. It is, however, possible to simplify the system by substituting some yttrium by lanthanum. This stabilises the -polymorph of yttrium disilicate. The activation energy for crystallisation was observed to be similar to that for viscous flow of Y-Si-Al-O-N glasses.
91
Authors: Wynette Redington, J. Lonergan, G. Le Gonidec, A. Díaz, H. Bilgen, Stuart Hampshire
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