Exploring the Impact: Employees’ Work Intension for International Projects

Abstract:

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It has been found that it is often difficult for expatriates to work on international projects as their companies expand into foreign construction markets. The study aims at exploring impact and change in employees’ work intension for international projects. The selected companies are all engineering consulting firms because an increase of performing international projects either inland or overseas has been spotted in Taiwan. A total of 21 impact factors are found based on literature review, expert interviews, nationwide survey, and statistical analysis. The results show two conclusions: (1.) Three levels of impact are determined; (2.) The core impact factors suggest practitioners paying more attention on the following conditions of international projects — protest, weak environmental health, strong personal loneliness, extreme religion, shortage of child care, and insufficient repatriation plan. The contributions are expected to benefit employers to save recourse so as to select the most suitable employees for expatriation.

Info:

Periodical:

Edited by:

Xuejun Zhou

Pages:

2280-2283

DOI:

10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.94-96.2280

Citation:

J. H. Chen and J. Z. Lin, "Exploring the Impact: Employees’ Work Intension for International Projects", Applied Mechanics and Materials, Vols. 94-96, pp. 2280-2283, 2011

Online since:

September 2011

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Price:

$35.00

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