Effect of Particle Size on Some Properties of Rice Husk Particleboard

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The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of particle size on the mechanical properties (Modulus of Elasticity, Modulus of Rupture, and Internal Bond) and physical properties (thickness swelling and water absorption) of rice husk particleboard. The particle sizes used were 1.0mm, 1.18mm, 2mm, 2.36mm and 2.80mm. Each was mixed with a constant resin (urea formaldehyde) concentration of 20% of oven dry weight of rice husk particles. The results showed that as the particle size increased, the particleboard’s mechanical and physical properties decreased. For example, the modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture, internal bond, thickness swelling and water absorption for 1.0mm particle size particleboard were 1590N/mm2, 11.11N/mm2, 0.28N/mm2,10.90% and 38.53% respectively, while for 2.8mm particle size they were 1958N/mm2,14.2N/mm2, 0.44N/mm2, 11.51% and 47.21% respectively. Overall results showed that particleboard made from rice husk exceed the EN standard for modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture, internal bond. However, thickness swelling values were poor. Hence, the smaller the particle size the better the properties of the particleboard.

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Periodical:

Advanced Materials Research (Volumes 18-19)

Edited by:

Prof. A.O. Akii Ibhadode

Pages:

43-48

Citation:

J.O. Osarenmwinda and J.C. Nwachukwu, "Effect of Particle Size on Some Properties of Rice Husk Particleboard", Advanced Materials Research, Vols. 18-19, pp. 43-48, 2007

Online since:

June 2007

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$38.00

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.3403/00943044u

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.3403/00943162u

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[14] G. Nemli and G. Colakoglu, Effects of Mimosa Bark Usage on some Properties of Particleboard Turk. Agric. For. 29: 227-230, 2005. Table 1: Properties of Rice husk Particleboard Panel type Particle size (mm) MOE (N/mm 2) MOR (N/mm 2) IB (N/mm 2) TS (%) WA (%) A B C D E.

[1] 0.

[1] 18.

[2] 0.

[2] 36.

[2] 80 1958. 0 1789. 28 1687. 0 1640. 0 1590. 0.

[14] 20.

[13] 46.

[11] 84.

[11] 59.

[11] 11.

44.

39.

34.

316.

28.

[10] 90.

[11] 01.

[11] 20.

[11] 25.

[11] 51 38. 53.

[40] 98.

[42] 92.

[44] 85.

[47] 21 Note: MOE, MOR, IB, TS and WA mean Modulus of elasticity, Modulus of rupture, internal bond strength, Thickness swell and Water absorption respectively 1500 1550 1600 1650 1700 1750 1800 1850 1900 1950 2000 0 0. 5 1 1. 5 2 2. 5 3 Particle size mm Modulus of elasticity N/MM2 Fig 1: Effect of particle size on modulus of elasticity 11.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.measurement.2013.12.004

[11] 5 12.

[12] 5 13.

[13] 5 14.

[14] 5 0 0. 5 1 1. 5 2 2. 5 3 Particle size mm Modulus of rupture N/mm2 Fig 2: Effect of particle size on modulus of rupture.

25.

27.

29.

31.

33.

35.

37.

39.

41.

43.

45 0 0. 5 1 1. 5 2 2. 5 3 Particle size mm Internal bond strengthy Fig 3: Effect of particle size on internal bond strength 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 0 0 . 5 1 1. 5 2 2 . 5 3 Particle size mm % Thickness swelling (TA) and Water Absorption (WA) Fig 4: Effect of particle size on the % thickness swelling (▲) and water absorption (■).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9016-5_2