Understanding the Hydrodynamics of Swimming: From Fish Fins to Flexible Propulsors for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

Abstract:

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The research effort described here is concerned with developing a maneuvering propulsor for an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV’s) based on the mechanical design and performance of sunfish pectoral fin. Bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) are highly maneuverable bony fishes that have been the subject of a number of experimental analyses of locomotor function [5, 6]. Although swimming generally involves the coordinated movement of many fin surfaces, the sunfish is capable of propulsion and maneuvering using almost exclusively the pectoral fins. They use pectoral fins exclusively for propulsion at speeds of less than 1.1 body length per second (BL/s). The curve in Fig. 1 depicts two peaks of body acceleration of bluegill sunfish during steady forward swimming. These abilities are the direct result of their pectoral fins being highly deformable control surfaces that can create vectored thrust. The motivation here is that by understanding these complex, highly controlled movements and by borrowing appropriately from pectoral fin design, a bio-robotic propulsor can be designed to provide vectored thrust and high levels of control to AUVs. This paper will focus on analyses of bluegill sunfish’s pectoral fin hydrodynamics which were carried out to guide the design of a flexible propulsor for AUV’s

Info:

Periodical:

Edited by:

Pietro VINCENZINI and Salvatore GRAZIANI

Pages:

193-202

DOI:

10.4028/www.scientific.net/AST.58.193

Citation:

M. Bozkurttas et al., "Understanding the Hydrodynamics of Swimming: From Fish Fins to Flexible Propulsors for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles", Advances in Science and Technology, Vol. 58, pp. 193-202, 2008

Online since:

September 2008

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Price:

$35.00

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