Calcite Bone Substitute Prepared from Calcium Hydroxide Compact Using Heat-Treatment under Carbon Dioxide Atmosphere

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The purpose of this study is to investigate whether calcite blocks with high mechanical property could be obtained for a short period from calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) compact using heat-treatment under carbon dioxide (CO2) atmosphere. The Ca(OH)2 disks compacted with different pressure was heated at different temperature ranging from 200°C to 800°C for an hour under CO2 atmosphere. From the X-ray diffractometry, Ca(OH)2 converted into calcite along with the rise of the heating temperature. Small amount of unreacted Ca(OH)2 remained in samples heated at 600°C whereas samples treated at 800°C converted to calcite with very small amount of calcium oxide. The diametral tensile strength (DTS) value increased with the rise of heating temperature up to 600°C then decreased down to 800°C. Meanwhile, the porosity decreased with the rise of heating temperature up to 600°C then slightly increased up to 800°C. From the scanning electron microscope observation, grains grew bigger along with the rise of heating temperature. Intergranular space between grains decreased from 200°C to 600°C. The highest DTS value (14 MPa±1.3) at 600°C could be the result of lesser intergranular space due to sintering.

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Periodical:

Key Engineering Materials (Volumes 493-494)

Main Theme:

Edited by:

Eyup Sabri Kayali, Gultekin Goller and Ipek Akin

Pages:

166-169

DOI:

10.4028/www.scientific.net/KEM.493-494.166

Citation:

K. Tsuru et al., "Calcite Bone Substitute Prepared from Calcium Hydroxide Compact Using Heat-Treatment under Carbon Dioxide Atmosphere", Key Engineering Materials, Vols. 493-494, pp. 166-169, 2012

Online since:

October 2011

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Price:

$38.00

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