Heat Integration and Storage Concepts for Increasing the Energy Efficiency in Domestic Households

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A promising approach for increasing the energy efficiency of domestic households and buildings is to optimize the whole energy system by coupling of different heat sources and sinks. This procedure, known as heat integration, is state of the art in the industrial sector and is now applied to the residential sector. In this work several options for increasing the energy efficiency and for recovering waste heat are discussed. In order to reduce the primary energy demand different waste heat sources like domestic hot water or household appliances (refrigerators or freezers) were evaluated. The first step is the development of an advanced form of the stationary Pinch Analysis. This was subsequently applied to determine the thermodynamically possible energy saving for a single family home.

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Edited by:

Jörg Franke and Markus Michl

Pages:

50-58

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M. Beck et al., "Heat Integration and Storage Concepts for Increasing the Energy Efficiency in Domestic Households", Advanced Engineering Forum, Vol. 19, pp. 50-58, 2016

Online since:

October 2016

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$41.00

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