A Unified Adaptive Fanger's Model for Thermal Comfort in Tropical Countries

Abstract:

Article Preview

Thermal comfort, which used to be a luxury in life has transformed into a necessity in modern lives. Tropical country such as Malaysia has hot and humid climate all year round. Much air conditioning is required in tropical countries to provide thermal comfort for indoor occupants. Fangers model is deterministic as it regards the heat fluxes across the boundary between humans and their thermal environment. Fangers model is adopted by ASRHAE Standard 55 in 1992 but it has over-predicted thermal preferences of those living in tropics. Malaysians who are used to hot and humid climates prefer warmer indoor temperature, as hypothesized in adaptive model. Adaptive model is said to predict thermal comfort more accurately than Fangers model as it relates the indoor comfortable temperature to outdoor air temperature. The objective of this research is to integrate the adaptive theories into Fangers model and to synthesize a new thermal comfort model which is expected to accurately predict thermal comfort in tropical countries. As the adaptive theory says that not all peoples thermal preferences are affected by thermal histories and contextual factors, the new model has proposed a broader operation range of PMV for air conditioner. The increment of PMV range from ±1.0 to ±1.17 for 80% satisfaction requirement is proved to applicable in Malaysia.

Info:

Periodical:

Edited by:

Wahyu Kuntjoro, Aidah Jumahat, Farrahshaida Mohd Salleh and Rosnadiah Bahsan

Pages:

799-808

Citation:

J. S. Pau and W. K.S. Pao, "A Unified Adaptive Fanger's Model for Thermal Comfort in Tropical Countries", Applied Mechanics and Materials, Vol. 393, pp. 799-808, 2013

Online since:

September 2013

Export:

Price:

$41.00

[1] ASRHAE, ASRHAE Standard 55: Thermal Environment Conditions for Human Occupancy, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, (1992).

[2] Fanger PO, & Toftum J. Extension of PMV Model to Non-Air-Conditioned Buildings in Warm Climates. Elsevier Science: Energy and Building 2002; 34: pp.533-536.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-7788(02)00003-8

[3] de Dear RJ, Fountain M and Brager GS. Expectations of Indoor Climate Control, Elsevier Science 1996; 24: pp.533-536.

[4] Kepton WL. Energy and Buildings (1992).

[5] Fountain M, Brager GS and de Dear RJ. Expectations of Indoor Climate Control. Elsevier Science 1996; 24: pp.614-626.

[6] Becker S, Potchter O and Yaakov Y. Calculated and Observed Human Thermal Sensation in An Extremely Hot and Dry Climate. Elsevier Science: Energy and Buildings 2002; 35: pp.747-756.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-7788(02)00228-1

[7] ASHRAE, ASHRAE Standard 55P-2003: Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy, American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASRHAE), (2003).

[8] Fanger PO. Thermal Comfort (1970).

[9] Halawa EE. Operative Temperature Measurement and Control. MSc Thesis (1994).

[10] ISO, International Standard 7730 (3): Ergonomics of the Thermal Environment – Analytical Determination and Interpretation of Thermal Comfort using Calculation of the PMV and PPD Indices and Local Thermal Comfort Criteria. International Standard (2005).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3403/30046382

[11] de Dear RJ and Brager GS. Developing an Adaptive Model of Thermal Comfort and Preferences. Center for the Built Environment UC Berkeley 1998; 104(1): pp.145-167.

[12] Wong NH, Khoo SS. Thermal Comfort in Classrooms in the Tropics. Elsevier Science: Energy and Building 2002; 35: pp.337-351.

[13] Wong NH, Feriadi H, Lim PY, Tham KW, Sekhar C, Cheong KW. Thermal Comfort Evaluation of Naturally Ventilated Public Housing in Singapore. Pergamon: Building and Environment 2002; 35: pp.337-351.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0360-1323(01)00103-2

[14] Nicol JF. Adaptive Thermal Comfort Standards in the Hot-Humid Tropics. Elsevier: Energy and Buildings 2004; 36(7): pp.628-637.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2004.01.016

[15] Gagge AP and Burton AC. A Practical System of Units for the Description of Heat Exchange of Man with His Environment Science 1941; 94: pp.428-430.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.94.2445.428

[16] de Dear RJ and Brager GS. Developing an Adaptive Model of Thermal Comfort and Preferences. Center for the Built Environment UC Berkeley 1998; 104(1): pp.145-167.

[17] Nicol JF, Humphreys MA. Adaptive Thermal Comfort and Sustainable Thermal Standards for Buildings. Elsevier Science: Energy and Buildings 2002; 34: pp.563-572.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-7788(02)00006-3

[18] Mui KW, Chan WT. Adaptive Comfort Temperature Model of Air Conditioned Building in Hong Kong. Permagon: Building and Environment 2003; 38: pp.837-852.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0360-1323(03)00020-9

[19] Goldman RF. Evaluating the Effects of Clothing on the Wearer. Elsevier Science 1981: pp.41-55.

[20] Parsons KC. Human thermal Environments: The Effects of Hot, Moderate and Cold Environments on Human Health, Comfort and Performance. London: Taylor and Francis (1993).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203302620

[21] Morgan C and de Dear RJ. Weather, Clothing and Thermal Adaptation to Indoor Climate. Climate Research 2003; 39(2): pp.169-182.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3354/cr024267

[22] de Dear RJ and Brager GS. Thermal Comfort in Naturally Ventilated Buildings: Revisions to ASHRAE Standard 55. Energy Buildings 2002; 34: pp.549-561.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-7788(02)00005-1

[23] Gut P and Ackerknecht D. Human Requirements Regarding Indoor Climate. Climate Responsive Building 1993; 16.

[24] de Dear RJ and Brager GS. The Adaptive Model of Thermal Comfort and Energy Conservation in the Built Environment. Int J Biometeorol 2001; 45: pp.100-108.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s004840100093

[25] de Dear RJ and Brager GS. Thermal Comfort in Naturally Ventilated Buildings: Revisions to ASHRAE Standard 55. Energy Buildings 2002; 34: pp.549-561.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-7788(02)00005-1

[26] Fanger PO. Energy and Building. In Climate Responsive Building (1985).

[27] Ismail AR, Jusoh N, Zulkifli R, Sopian K and Deros BM. Thermal Comfort Assessment: A Case Study at Malaysian Automotive Industry. American Journal of Applied Sciences 2009; 6(8): 1495-1501.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3844/ajassp.2009.1495.1501

[28] Yau YH, Chew BT and Saifullah A. A Field Study on Thermal Comfort in Lecture Halls in the Tropics. ISHVAC. Shanghai: ISI/SCOPUS Cited Publication 2011: pp.309-317.

[29] Cheong KWD et al. Thermal Comfort Study of an Air-Conditioned Lecture Theatre in the Tropics. Building and Environment 2003; 38 (1), 63-73.

[30] Yau YH and Saifullah BT. A Field Study on Thermal Comfort of Occupants and Acceptable Neutral Temperature at the National Museum in Malaysia, International Society of Built Environment (2011).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1420326x11429976

[31] Karyono TH. Report on Thermal Comfort and Building Energy Studies in Jakarta-Indonesia. Elsevier Science : Building and Environment 2000; 35: pp.77-90.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0360-1323(98)00066-3