Development of Pore Pressure Measurement System in Lacunocanalicular Network of Trabeculae Using MEMS Based Micro-Pressure Transducer

Abstract:

Article Preview

Experimental measurement of pore pressure generation in lacunocanalicular network of trabeculae is never measured, although the characteristics could be important for bone remodeling. In this study, the pore pressure generation in micro-trabecular specimens within the elastic range was measured in vitro using a specially designed micro-experimental setup and a MEMS based micro-pressure transducer. Then, a quasi-static loading (9㎛/min) was applied up to the strain of 0.4 % with measuring pore pressure generations in the undrained and drained conditions. 49.2 ± 4.45 KPa of pore pressure generation at the 0.4% strain was found in the undrained condition. In contrast, no pore pressure generation was measured in the drained condition. The result could let us know the amount of a possible maximum pore pressure generation in lacunocanalicular network of trabeculae within the elastic range.

Info:

Periodical:

Key Engineering Materials (Volumes 345-346)

Edited by:

S.W. Nam, Y.W. Chang, S.B. Lee and N.J. Kim

Pages:

1157-1160

Citation:

J. H. Hong and Y. H. Park, "Development of Pore Pressure Measurement System in Lacunocanalicular Network of Trabeculae Using MEMS Based Micro-Pressure Transducer ", Key Engineering Materials, Vols. 345-346, pp. 1157-1160, 2007

Online since:

August 2007

Export:

Price:

$38.00

[1] K. Piekarski and M. Munro: Transport mechanism operating between blood supply and osteocytes in long bones, Nature. Vol. 269 (1977), pp.80-82.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/269080a0

[2] J. Nagatomi, B.P. Arulanandam, D.W. Metzger, A. Meunier, and R. Bizios: Effects of cyclic pressure on bone marrow cell cultures, J. Biomech. Eng. Vol. 123 (2002), pp.308-314.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1115/1.1468867

[3] H. Ozawa, K. Imamura, E. Abe, N. Takahashi, T. Hiraide, Y. Shibasaki, T. Fukuhara, and T. Suda: Effect of a continuously applied compressive pressure on mouse osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) in vitro, J. Cell Physiol. Vol. 142 (1990), pp.177-185.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/jcp.1041420122

[4] J. You, C.E. Yellowley, H.J. Donahue, Y. Zhang, Q. Chen, C.R. Jacobs: Substrate deformation levels associated with routine physical activity are less stimulatory to bone cells relative to loading-induced oscillatory fluid flow, J. Biomech. Eng. Vol. 122 (2000).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1115/1.1287161

[5] T.M.L. Knothe and U. Knothe: An ex in vivo model to study transport processes and fluid flow in loaded bone, J. Biomech. Vol. 33 (2000), pp.247-254.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0021-9290(99)00143-8

[6] L. Wang, C. Ciani, S.B. Doty, S.P. Fritton: Delineating bone's interstitial fluid pathway in vivo, Bone. Vol. 34 (2004), pp.499-509.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2003.11.022

[7] S. Weinbaum, S.C. Cowin, and Y. Zeng: A model for the excitation of osteocytes by mechanical loadinginduced bone fluid shear stresses, J. Biomech. Vol. 27(1994), pp.339-360.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/0021-9290(94)90010-8

[8] R.M. Dillaman, D. Roer, and D.M. Gay, Fluid movement in bone : theoretical and empirical, J. Biomech. Vol. 24(1991), pp.163-177.

Fetching data from Crossref.
This may take some time to load.