Fabrication of Titanium Fiber Scaffold for Biomaterial Use

Abstract:

Article Preview

In the event of a significant injury, human bone must be repaired by artificial means. In the present study, we used titanium (Ti) to create a scaffold for cell renewal with an emphasis on strength. Because scaffolds for cell renewal require a microporous structure that enables supply of oxygen and nutrients, sintered Ti fiber was used. However, although titanium has a high fracture toughness, it does not bind to hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main component of bone, and thus requires addition of bioactivity. Following treatment by sodium hydroxide, titanium fibers were heated and immersed in simulated body fluid. Through this process, HAp was formed on the titanium surface to create a bioactive material with both a high strength and biocompatibility. Following approximately two weeks of immersion in simulated body fluid, HAp was formed such that it covered the surroundings of titanium fibers without any gaps. In addition, the fracture condition of HAp was analyzed by conducting mechanical tests, such as tensile strength and compression tests, on the titanium fibers on which HAp was formed. Furthermore, collagen coating was performed on the titanium surface, and the material was immersed in simulated body fluid to investigate and compare HAp formation.

Info:

Periodical:

Edited by:

Pietro VINCENZINI and Danilo DE ROSSI

Pages:

131-134

DOI:

10.4028/www.scientific.net/AST.57.131

Citation:

S. Saito et al., "Fabrication of Titanium Fiber Scaffold for Biomaterial Use", Advances in Science and Technology, Vol. 57, pp. 131-134, 2008

Online since:

September 2008

Export:

Price:

$35.00

In order to see related information, you need to Login.

In order to see related information, you need to Login.