Development of 3D Antibiotic-Eluting Bioresorbable Scaffold with Attenuating Envelopes

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Thick Section 3D Bioresorbable Scaffolds Are Proposed as a Potential Alternative to Biologic Skin Grafts and Supportive Fillers for Non-Healing Chronic Wound Ulcers. Synthetic Bioresorbable Scaffolds Avoid Human and Animal Derived Contamination Risks, Provide Feasible Shelf Life, Availability and Cost, and Act as a Consistent Platform for Localized Drug Elution. A Bioresorbable Polyester-Based Scaffold (Infilon™) Was Investigated as a Drug Delivery Vehicle for Chloramphenicol Antibiotic (CAP) Combined with a Bioactive Envelope. the Effect of Varying Envelope Protocols on Antibiotic Elution Profile and Antimicrobial Potency on Scaffolds Were Analysed. the Maximum Antibiotic Loading Efficiency of the Scaffold Was 10.18% W/w. the Antibiotic Elution Profile Showed that the Burst Phase Lasted One Hour Subsequent to a Sustained Phase Approaching near Asymptotic Release. Envelope Permutations of Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) and Bioglass 45S5 Reduced the Total Amount of Antibiotic Released by 1 to 1.8 Mg while the Polyethylene Oxide Envelope Extended the Burst Phase to 2 Hours. CAP Loaded Scaffolds Demonstrated Antimicrobial Effectiveness for 24 Hours. Results Show Potential for the Infilon™ Scaffold to Be Used as a Platform for Localized Antibiotic Delivery. Delivery Profiles Can Be Enhanced with Additional BMG or Bioglass Envelopes. this Approach Has Opportunity to Provide a Synergistic Coupling of Antimicrobial Action and the Harbouring of Granular Tissue Subsequent to Final Wound Healing.

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55-62

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B. Chow et al., "Development of 3D Antibiotic-Eluting Bioresorbable Scaffold with Attenuating Envelopes", Journal of Biomimetics, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Vol. 15, pp. 55-62, 2012

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October 2012

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$38.00

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