A Study of Residual Stresses in Al/SiCp Linear Friction Weldment by Energy-Dispersive Neutron Diffraction

Abstract:

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Linear friction welding (LFW) is a solid state joining process for bonding of two flatedged, complex geometry components through relative reciprocating motion under axial (compressive) forces. Although the proof of principle has been obtained some time ago, recently a number of studies have been published aimed at optimising the joining operations to obtain best joint strength and reduced distortion and residual stress. The present paper is devoted to the study of linear friction welds between components made from aluminium alloy 2124 matrix composite (AMC) reinforced with 25vol% particulate silicon carbide (SiCp). Neutron diffraction was used to measure interplanar lattice spacings in the matrix and reinforcement, and to deduce residual elastic strains and stresses as a function of distance from the bond line. Significant asymmetry is observed in the residual stress distribution within the two components being joined, that may be associated with the difference in the microstructure and texture.

Info:

Periodical:

Key Engineering Materials (Volumes 385-387)

Edited by:

H.S. Lee, I.S. Yoon and M.H. Aliabadi

Pages:

517-520

DOI:

10.4028/www.scientific.net/KEM.385-387.517

Citation:

T. S. Jun et al., "A Study of Residual Stresses in Al/SiCp Linear Friction Weldment by Energy-Dispersive Neutron Diffraction", Key Engineering Materials, Vols. 385-387, pp. 517-520, 2008

Online since:

July 2008

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Price:

$35.00

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